Click below for a Demo of the online course;

 

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Student Demo
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Password: teacher98 

 

World History

Prerequisite: None

Length: Two semesters

Credits: 1.0

 

World History helps students learn to see the world today as a product of a process that began thousands of years ago when humans became a speaking, traveling, and trading species. Through historical analysis grounded in primary sources, case studies, and research, students investigate the continuity and change of human culture, governments, economic systems, and social structures. Students build and practice historical thinking skills, learning to connect specific people, places, events and ideas to the larger trends of world history. In critical reading activities, feedback-rich instruction, and application-oriented assignments, students develop their capacity to reason chronologically, interpret and synthesize sources, identify connections between ideas, and develop well-supported historical arguments. Students write throughout the course, responding to primary sources and historical narratives through journal entries, essays and visual presentations of social studies content. In discussion activities, students respond to the position of others while staking and defending their own claim. The course’s rigorous instruction is supported with relevant materials and active learning opportunities to ensure students at all levels can master the key historical thinking skills.

 

U.S. History

Prerequisite: None

Length: Two semesters

Credits: 1.0

 

U.S. History traces the nation’s history from the pre-colonial period to the present. Students learn about the Native American, European, and African people who lived in America before it became the United States. They examine the beliefs and philosophies that informed the American Revolution and the subsequent formation of the government and political system. Students investigate the economic, cultural, and social motives for the nation’s expansion, as well as the conflicting notions of liberty that eventually resulted in civil war. The course describes the emergence of the United States as an industrial nation and then focuses on its role in modern world affairs. Moving into the 20th and 21st centuries, students probe how the Cold War, and the “information revolution” affected the lives of ordinary Americans. Woven through this chronological sequence is a strong focus on the changing conditions of women, African Americans, and other minority groups. The course emphasizes the development of historical analysis skills such as comparing and contrasting, differentiating between facts and interpretations, considering multiple perspectives, and analyzing cause-and-effect relationships. These skills are applied to text interpretation and in written assignments that guide learners step-by-step through problem-solving activities.

 

Geography and World Cultures

Prerequisite: None

Length: One semester

Credits: 0.5

 

Geography and World Cultures offers a tightly focused and scaffolded curriculum that enables students to explore how geographic features, human relationships, political and social structures, economics, science and technology, and the arts have developed and influenced life in countries around the world. Along the way, students are given rigorous instruction on how to read maps, charts, and graphs, and how to create them. Geography and World Cultures is designed as the first course in the social studies sequence. It develops note-taking skills, teaches the basic elements of analytic writing, and introduces students to the close examination of primary sources.

 

Multicultural Studies

Prerequisite: None

Length: One semester

Credits: 0.5

 

Multicultural Studies is a history and sociology course that examines the United States as a multicultural nation. The course emphasizes the perspectives of minority groups while allowing students from all backgrounds to better understand and appreciate how race, culture and ethnicity, and identity contribute to their experiences. Major topics in the course include identity, immigration, assimilation and distinctiveness, power and oppression, struggles for rights, regionalism, culture and the media, and the formation of new cultures. Students are asked to reflect critically on their own experiences as well as those of others. Interactive multimedia activities include personal and historical accounts to which students respond using methods of inquiry from history, sociology, and psychology. Written assignments and Journals provide opportunities for students to practice and develop skills for thinking and communicating about race, culture, ethnicity, and identity.

 

Sociology

Prerequisite: None

Length: One semester

Credits: 0.5

 

Sociology examines why people think and behave as they do in relationships, groups, institutions, and societies. Major course topics include individual and group identity, social structures and institutions, social change, social stratification social dynamics in recent and current events, the effects of social change on individuals, and the research methods used by social scientists. Students are asked to reflect critically on their own experience and perspectives, as well as on the ideas of sociologists. Interactive multimedia activities include personal and historical accounts to which students respond, using methods of inquiry from sociology. Written assignments and journals provide opportunities to practice and develop skills in thinking and communicating about human relationships, individual and group identity, and all other major course topics.

 

U.S. and Global Economics

Prerequisite: U.S. Government and Politics is recommended, but not required

Length: One semester

Credits: 0.5

 

U.S. and Global Economics offers a tightly focused and scaffolded curriculum that provides an introduction to key economic principles. The course covers fundamental properties of economics, including an examination of markets from both historical and current perspectives; the basics of supply and demand; the theories of early economic philosophers such as Adam Smith and David Ricardo; theories of value; the concept of money and how it evolved; the role of banks, investment houses, and the Federal Reserve; Keynesian economics; the productivity, wages, investment, and growth involved in capitalism; unemployment, inflation, and the national debt; and a survey o markets in areas such as China, Europe, and the Middle East. U.S. and Global Economics is designed to fall in the fourth year of social studies instruction. Students perfect their analytic writing through a scaffolded series of analytic assignments and written lesson tests. They also apply basic mathematics to economic concepts. Students read selections from annotated primary documents and apply those readings to the course content.

 

U.S. Government and Politics

Prerequisite: U.S. History is recommended, but not required

Length: One semester

Credits: 0.5

 

U.S. Government and Politics offers a tightly focused and scaffolded curriculum that uses the perspective of political institutions to explore the history, organization, and functions of the U.S. government. Beginning with basic theories of government, moving to the Declaration of Independence, and continuing to the present day, the course explores the relationship between individual Americans and the governing bodies. It covers the political culture of the country and gains insight into the challenges faced by presidents, congressional representatives, and other political figures. It also covers the roles of political parties, interest groups, the media, and the Supreme Court. U.S. Government and Politics is designed to fall in the fourth year of social studies instruction. Students perfect their analytic writing through a scaffolded series of analytic assignments and written lesson tests. Students read annotated primary documents and apply those documents to the course content.

 

World History to the Renaissance

Prerequisite: None

Length: Two semesters

Credits: 1.0

 

World History to the Renaissance traces the development of civilizations around the world from prehistory to the Renaissance. The course covers major themes in world history, including the development and influence of human-geographic relationships, political and social structures, economic systems, major religions and belief systems, science and technology, and the arts. Topics covered in this course include the birth of civilizations; the classical civilizations of India, China, Greece, and Rome; the rise of new empires such as the Byzantine; and an examination of civilizations in Africa and North and South America. From there, students journey to the Middle Ages and into the Renaissance. Primary sources documents, which appear frequently, encourage students to make connections to evidence from the past. Writing skills are honed through a spiraled sequence of short analytic pieces.

 

AP Macroeconomics

Prerequisites: Algebra II (or Math Analysis)

Length: One semester

Credits: 0.5

 

Advanced Placement Macroeconomics students learn why and how the world economy can change from month to month, how to identify trends in our economy, and how to use those trends to develop performance measures and predictors of economic growth or decline. They will also examine how individuals, institutions, and economic influences affect people, and how those factors can impact employment rates, government spending, inflation, taxes and production. The equivalent of an introductory college-level class, this course prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in business, political science and history. This course has been authorized by the College Board to use the AP designation.

 

AP Microeconomics

Prerequisites: Algebra I

Length: One semester

Credits: 0.5

 

Advanced Placement Microeconomics studies the behavior of individuals and businesses as they exchange goods and services in the marketplace. Students will learn why the same product costs different amounts at different stores, in different cities, at different times. They’ll also learn to spot patterns in economic behavior and how to use those patterns to explain buyer and seller behavior under various conditions. Microeconomics studies the economic way of thinking, understanding the nature and function of markets, the role of scarcity and competition, the influence of factor such as interest rates on business decisions, and the role of government in promoting a healthy economy. The equivalent of an introductory college-level course, AP Microeconomics prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in business, history, and political science.

 

AP U.S. Government and Politics

Prerequisites: U.S. History

Length: One semester

Credits: 0.5

 

Advanced Placement U.S. Government and Politics studies the operations and structure of the U.S. government and the behavior of the electorate and politicians. Students will gain the analytic perspective necessary to critically evaluate political data, hypotheses, concepts, opinions, and processes. Along the way, they’ll learn how to gather data about political behavior and develop their own theoretical analysis of American politics. They’ll also build the skills they need to examine general propositions about government and politics, and to analyze the specific relationships between political, social, and economic institutions. The equivalent of an introductory college-level course, AP U.S. Government and Politics prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in political science, law, education, business, and history. This course has been authorized by the College Board to use the AP designation.

 

AP U.S. History

Prerequisite: At least a grade of B- in most recent social studies course

Length: Two semesters

Credits: 1.0

 

In AP U.S. History, students investigate the development of American economics, politics, and culture through historical analysis grounded in primary sources, research, and writing. The equivalent of an introductory college-level course, AP U.S. History prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in history, political science, economics, sociology, and law. Through the examination of historical themes and the application of historical thinking skills, students learn to connect specific people, places, events, and ideas to the larger trends of U.S. history. Critical-reading activities, feedback-rich instruction, and application-oriented assignments hone students’ ability to reason chronologically, to interpret historical sources, and to construct well-supported historical arguments. Students write throughout the course, responding to primary and secondary sources through journal entries, essays, and visual presentations of historical content. In discussion activities, students respond to the positions of others while staking and defending claims of their own. Robust scaffolding, rigorous instruction, relevant material, and regular opportunities for active learning ensure that students can achieve mastery of the skills necessary to excel on the AP exam.

 

Art Appreciation

Prerequisite: None

Length: One semester

Credits: 0.5

 

Art Appreciation is a survey of the history of Western visual arts, with a primary focus on painting. Students begin with an introduction to the basic principles of painting and learn how to critique and compare works of art. Students then explore prehistoric and early Greek and Roman art before they move on to the art of the Middle Ages. Emphasis is placed on the Renaissance and the principles and masters that emerged in Italy and northern Europe. Students continue their art tour with the United States during the 20th century, a time of great innovation as abstract art took center stage. While Western art is the course’s primary focus, students will finish the course by studying artistic traditions from Africa, Asia, Oceania, and the Americas. Coverage of each artistic movement highlights historical context and introduces students to key artists who represent a variety of geographic locations. Throughout the course, students apply what they have learned about art critique to analyze and evaluate both individual artists and individual works of art. Art Appreciation encompasses a variety of skills to enable students to critique, compare, and perhaps influence their own works of art.

 

Music Appreciation

Prerequisite: None

Length: Two semesters

Credits: 0.5

 

Music Appreciation is a streamlined course that introduces student to the history, theory, and genres of music, from the most primitive surviving examples, through the classical to the most contemporary in the world at large. The course is offered in a two-semester format: The first semester cover primitive musical forms, classical music, and American jazz; the second semester presents the rich modern traditions, including gospel, folk, soul, blues, Latin rhythms, rock and roll, and hip-hop. The course explores the interface of music and social movements and examines how the emergent global society and the Internet are bringing musical forms together in new ways from all around the world.

 

Physical Education

Prerequisite: None

Length: One semester

Credits: 0.5

 

Physical Education offers students cardiovascular, aerobic, and muscle-toning activities. The course promotes a keen understanding of the value of physical fitness and aims to motivate students o participate in physical activities throughout their lives. Specific areas of study include: cardiovascular exercise and care, safe exercising, building muscle strength and endurance, injury prevention, fitness skills and FITT benchmarks, goal setting, nutrition and diet (vitamins and minerals, food labels, and the evaluation of product claims), and stress management.

 

Skills for Health

Prerequisite: None

Length: One semester

Credits: 0.5

 

Skills for Health is a valuable, skills-based health education course designed for general education in grades 9 through 12. The course helps students develop knowledge and essential skills in a variety of health-related subjects, including mental and emotional health; nutrition; physical activity; substance use and abuse; injury prevention and safety; and personal health, environmental conservation, and community health resources. Through the use of accessible information and real-life simulations, students apply the seven health skills. These include access to valid health information; self-management; analysis of internal and external influences; interpersonal communication; decision making; goal setting; and advocacy. Students who complete Skills for Health acquire the skills they need to protect, enhance, and promote their own health and the health of others.

 

Click below for a Demo of the online course;

 

Login Link: https://www.apexvs.com/ApexUI/default.aspx

Student Demo
Account Login:
 coredemo
Password: democore14

Teacher Demo
Account Login:
 teacherdemo11
Password: teacher98