Science

At the secondary level, grades 9-12, students expand their understanding of history and the social sciences. Following the geographic and historic perspectives of the elementary and middle grades, the secondary social studies program builds upon the study of North Carolina at grades four and eight, the United States at grade five, and the cultural geographic study of the world in grades five, six, and seven. The secondary level moves to a formal study of world and United States history; links civics and economics in a course intended to provide students with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to enter effectively into adult citizenship; and suggests a variety of social studies electives.

While we cannot predict what specific knowledge and behavior will be in demand as we venture in the twenty-first century, through social studies we can concentrate on educating citizens who will be scholarly, exercise leadership, and support democratic ideals. We can prepare our students for a post secondary world, be it continued schooling or the workforce.

Courses

Course Prerequisite Length Credits
Biology None Two semesters 1.0
Chemistry None Two semesters 1.0
Physics None Two semesters 1.0

 

 

 

Biology

Prerequisite: None

Length: Two semesters

Credits: 1.0

 

Biology focuses on the mastery of basic biological concepts and models while building scientific inquiry skills and exploring the connections between living things and their environment. The course begins with an introduction to the nature of science and biology, including the major themes of structure and function, matter and energy flow, systems, and the interconnectedness of life. Students then apply those themes to the structure and function of the cell, cellular metabolism, and biogeochemical cycles. Building on this foundation, students explore the connections and interactions between living things by studying genetics, ecosystems, natural selection, and evolution. The course ends with an applied look at human biology. Scientific inquiry skills a e embedded in the direct instruction, wherein students learn to ask scientific questions, form and test hypotheses, and use logic and evidence to draw conclusions about the concepts. Lab activities reinforce critical thinking, writing, and communication skills and help develop a deeper understanding of the nature of science.

 

Chemistry

Prerequisites: A physical science course and one year of Algebra

Length: Two semesters

Credits: 1.0

 

Chemistry offers a curriculum that emphasizes students’ understanding of fundamental chemistry concepts while helping them acquire tools to be conversant in a society highly influenced by science and technology. The course provides students with opportunities to learn and practice critical scientific skills within the context of relevant scientific questions. Topics include the nature of science, the importance of chemistry to society, atomic structure, bonding in matter, chemical reactions, redox reactions, electrochemistry, phases of matter, equilibrium and kinetics, acids and bases, thermodynamics, quantum mechanics, nuclear reactions, organic chemistry, and alternative energy Scientific inquiry skills a e embedded in the direct instruction, wherein students learn to ask scientific questions, form and test hypotheses, and use logic and evidence to draw conclusions about the concepts. Lab activities reinforce critical thinking, writing, and communication skills and help students develop a deeper understanding of the nature of science. Throughout this course, students are given an opportunity to understand how chemistry concepts are applied in technology and engineering. Journal and Practice activities provide additional opportunities for students to apply concepts learned in the Studies and practice their writing skills.

 

Physics

Prerequisite: Middle school/junior Virtual school Physics, and one year of Algebra (two years recommended

Length: Two semesters

Credits: 1.0

 

Physics offers a curriculum that emphasizes students’ understanding of fundamental physics concepts while helping them acquire tools to be conversant in a society Virtually influenced by science and technology. The course provides students with opportunities to learn and practice critical scientific skills wit in the context of relevant scientific questions. Topics include the nature of science, math for physics, energy, kinematics, force and motion, momentum, gravitation, chemistry for physics, thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, waves, nuclear physics, quantum physics, and cosmology. Scientific inquiry skills are embedded in the direct instruction, wherein students learn to ask scientific questions, form and test hypotheses, and use logic and evidence to draw conclusions about the concepts. Lab activities reinforce critical thinking, writing, and communication skills and help students develop a deeper understanding of the nature of science. Throughout this course, students are given an opportunity to understand how physics concepts are applied in technology and engineering. Journal and Practice activities provide additional opportunities for students to apply concepts learned in the Studies and practice their writing skills.